Kevin. New England. Some of my interests include sci-fi, sci-non-fi, music theory, humor, and Alaska (grew up there). My age makes me more or less a grandparent on tumblr, but I'm not really that old. Not yet, at least. But probably older than you. Just saying.

 

I started this blog with the intention of creating and capturing cool stuff I find. A scrapbook, if you will.

 

When I find good internets, I will make them happen here. Check back often for more internets.

 

I put internets I like here

mosaic view of my stuff

20th June 2012

Photo reblogged from A story of a Man and the Moon with 5 notes


Planets are turning out to be so common that to show all the planets in our galaxy, this chart would have to be nested in itself—with each planet replaced by a copy of the chart—at least three levels deep.

If this doesn’t fill you with awe and appreciation of the universe, I don’t want to know you.

Planets are turning out to be so common that to show all the planets in our galaxy, this chart would have to be nested in itself—with each planet replaced by a copy of the chart—at least three levels deep.

If this doesn’t fill you with awe and appreciation of the universe, I don’t want to know you.

Tagged: spaceastronomyplanetsexploration

14th June 2012

Photo reblogged from Hovering Sombrero with 369 notes

kethera:

theatlantic:

Get Ready, Because Voyager I Is *ThisClose* to Leaving Our Solar System

Last week, in the corners of the Internet devoted to outer space, things started to get a little, well, hot. Voyager 1, the man-made object farthest away from Earth, was encountering a sharp uptick in the number of a certain kind of energetic particles around it. Had the spacecraft become the first human creation to “officially” leave the solar system?
It’s hard to overstate how wild an accomplishment this would be: A machine, built here on Earth by the brain- and handiwork of humans, has sailed from Florida, out of Earth’s orbit, beyond Mars, beyond the gas giants of Jupiter and Saturn, and may now have left the heliosphere — tiny dot in the universe beholden to our sun. Had it really happened? How would we know?
We’re not quite there yet, Voyager’s project scientist and former head of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, Edward Stone, told me. The spacecraft is on its way out — “it’s leaving the solar system” — but we don’t know how far it has to go or what that transition to interstellar space will look like.
Read more. [Image: NASA]


File under “Things that make me very happy.”

It makes me happy too, but also sad, a la this comic.

kethera:

theatlantic:

Get Ready, Because Voyager I Is *ThisClose* to Leaving Our Solar System

Last week, in the corners of the Internet devoted to outer space, things started to get a little, well, hot. Voyager 1, the man-made object farthest away from Earth, was encountering a sharp uptick in the number of a certain kind of energetic particles around it. Had the spacecraft become the first human creation to “officially” leave the solar system?

It’s hard to overstate how wild an accomplishment this would be: A machine, built here on Earth by the brain- and handiwork of humans, has sailed from Florida, out of Earth’s orbit, beyond Mars, beyond the gas giants of Jupiter and Saturn, and may now have left the heliosphere — tiny dot in the universe beholden to our sun. Had it really happened? How would we know?

We’re not quite there yet, Voyager’s project scientist and former head of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab, Edward Stone, told me. The spacecraft is on its way out — “it’s leaving the solar system” — but we don’t know how far it has to go or what that transition to interstellar space will look like.

Read more. [Image: NASA]

File under “Things that make me very happy.”

It makes me happy too, but also sad, a la this comic.

Tagged: nasaspaceastronomyvoyager Iexplorationscience

Source: The Atlantic

9th August 2011

Quote reblogged from BLOGGING via TYPEWRITER. with 1,069 notes

Do you realize that the… bank bailout — that sum of money is greater than the entire 50-year running budget of NASA. And so when someone says ‘We don’t have enough money for this space program,’ I’m (saying) ‘No, it’s not that you don’t have enough money. It’s that the distribution of money that you’re spending is warped in some way, that you are removing the only thing that gives people something to dream about tomorrow.’

…In the 60’s and 70’s, you didn’t have to go more than a week before there was an article in Life magazine — ‘The Home Of Tomorrow.’ ‘The City Of Tomorrow.’ ‘The Transportation Of Tomorrow.’ All that ended in the 1970’s after we stopped going to the Moon. It all ended. We stopped dreaming.

And so I worry that the decisions the Congress makes doesn’t factor in the consequences of those decisions on tomorrow. Tomorrow is gone — metaphoric tomorrow, not the literal tomorrow.

(Politicians) are playing for the quarterly report; they’re playing for the next election cycle. And that is mortgaging the actual future of this nation. The rest of the world just passes by.

Dr. NEIL DeGRASSE TYSON, reacting to space programs such as the James Webb Space Telescope — the successor to the Hubble — falling to budget cuts, on Real Time (via inothernews)

Could he be any more awesome?

Tagged: scienceNeil deGrasse Tysonexplorationspacenasa

14th December 2010

Photo reblogged from "Deck Officer! DECK Officer!" with 16 notes

deckofficer:

Every space mission from the last 50 years mapped out.  Pretty awesome.  Click for hi-res.

deckofficer:

Every space mission from the last 50 years mapped out.  Pretty awesome.  Click for hi-res.

Tagged: spacenasaexplorationawesome